A Defining Moment

Steven NgProject Management, SoftwareLeave a Comment

YAPMA

If you look for project management software, you’ll find a ton of apps. A TON. Basecamp, Mavenlink, Zoho, Trello, Microsoft Project… the list goes on.

And yet, Vince and I still made Yet Another Project Management App. Are we crazy?

If you ask people who know us, they’ll probably say that there is indeed a little bit of crazy in us.

But that’s not why we built a project management app. I’ve worked with Vince since 2005, and we’ve been billing consultants for most, if not all, of that time period.

Project management tools are great for tracking your project completion, but they’re not quite what you need when you’re a small billing organization who can’t afford full time, dedicated project managers. Your projects are run and owned by consulting or team leads who are often hands on, writing code or doing other project delivery tasks.

These project owners are busy. They don’t want to be bogged down with chasing down team members for status reports and don’t want to be thinking about the real dollars involved with running a project, even though it’s their heads on the line when the project goes south.

Having run/owned projects myself, I’ve tried all sorts of tools – Excel, JIRA, Fogbugz, Microsoft Project. And none of them really did what I needed them to do. And what was that? Give me a constant overall picture of how my project was performing and being in-my-face when potential issues were arising. Having some time saving reports would also have been nice. I used to spend 2 hours a week per project collecting information from team members and compiling a status report. I’d rather have been coding.

The reason why there are so many project management apps on the market is simple. Different people have different ways of running projects, and one application can’t address everyone’s needs.

Assign It To Me

So that’s why Vince and I created Assign It To Me. We wanted to make a tool for us. We know there are plenty of small to medium sized billing companies that are just like us. Companies that cared about running projects well, that had to keep an eye on the profitability of their projects, and who usually had leaders who weren’t certified project managers who ran projects and were hands on in the project delivery.

Aside: If you’re wondering where the name “Assign It To Me” came from, Vince and I were struggling to come up with some fictitious, unique name that was easy to remember and had a .com domain available. When Vince and I divide up work, our most common demand to each other is “Just create a task and assign it to me”. The phrase is easy to remember and spell, and heck, we said it all the time, and boom. The rest is history.

So fast forward more months than I’d like to count (let’s save that for another blog post), and Assign It To Me turned into a real app on the web. It’s not perfect (is anything?) but it’s finally gotten to the point where we’re very proud of what we’ve built and are incredibly excited about adding new features. We “dogfooded” the application the whole time we developed it. And we think that made the application better, and more flexible. Vince and I use the app in very different ways on a daily basis. That Assign It To Me lets us manage projects differently is a testament to the benefits of eating your own dogfood while building an application. We used to sell enterprise software that made it obvious that its developers didn’t actually use the software. We didn’t want to do that, and, and in our own delusional minds, think Assign It To Me was made with love.

Who, What, Why

So back to the defining moment. We have discussions all the time about who Assign It To Me is intended to benefit, what makes Assign It To Me so different from our competition (many of which are great apps), and why those people should use it, since that ultimately defines what Assign It To Me is all about.

Who is Assign It To Me for? In a nutshell, it’s for small to medium sized companies who charge by the hour for their services. Digging deeper, these companies aren’t at the scale where they can hire full time project managers to run their projects. Also, these companies are owned by one or a few owners who need to keep an eye on the profitability of their projects so they can keep their company afloat. Keep in mind, however, that 80% of Assign It To Me’s functionality overlaps with other project management tools, so other people can still use it to run projects.

What makes Assign It To Me different is the 20% of its functionality/design that isn’t in other project management applications. Making money through well run projects is the mantra of Assign It To Me. Most project management software is just about the project. We try to capture the small pieces of seemingly trivial information that help inform company owners and project owners how their project is performing, and whether there may be any risks to the project’s success. We get that it’s not rocket science, but we try to deliver this value in ways that also make life easier for project owners and their team members.

And that’s why we think billing companies should use Assign It To Me. Wouldn’t you love to know if your project is healthy or sick? Wouldn’t your team members prefer to focus on their actual work than dealing with administrivia? Wouldn’t project owners prefer to let an application do some of the grunt work of running a project while giving them more time to do work? And wouldn’t it be great if the software was affordable enough that you didn’t have an excuse not to at least try it? In a nutshell, you only pay for project owners, and in most cases, it can pay itself off with a billable hour per month per project owner. We think Assign It To Me will save you more than that hour a month.

Watch This Space

So now you know what Assign It To Me is all about. Keep an eye on our blog (or subscribe to the RSS feed). Vince and I will be posting here regularly on a multitude of topics related to project management, running a consulting business, running a software business, and building an application.

We’re Go People!

Vince IarusciTeam BuildingLeave a Comment

A Core Value for all companies.

Here’s a story about an important core value that I learned during my Industrial Engineering course in college. Lloyd Bittle who was my professor for the course was a retired Industrial Engineer and his goal was not only to teach us how to improve organizational processes and systems but to become better workers and managers.

The Entrance

Without fail, every day it was the same routine. The lecture is about to start, my classmates and I are waiting for the big entrance. In walks Professor Bittle who makes his way up to the front of the room and turns the light on for the overhead projector.

The projector displays an image of a stacked red, yellow and green circle resembling a stop sign. He slams his hand down onto the green circle and points his boney finger towards my friend Terry who’s sitting beside me. We know what’s coming and we’re ready for the volley of questions coming our way.

Go People

Bittle : “Terry, what kind of people are we?”

Terry : “We're Go People!”

Bittle : “Very good Terry…that’s what I want to hear…and what kind of people are Go People?”

Terry : “Go People are motivated team players that have an open mind and are continually trying to improve their work and environment around them. They’re forward thinkers who are involved for the common good and they make things happen. Go People inspire others to become Go People. Go People are leaders.”

Bittle then moves his focus over to Sandra. This time he slams his hand on the red circle.

Stop People

Bittle : “Sandra, what kind of people do we want to avoid becoming?”

Sandra : “Stop People”

Bittle : “Ok Sandra, and why are stop people bad for the organization?”

Sandra : “Stop people wait for things to happen. They only do the work assigned to them and nothing more. They avoid taking any risks and are more interested in the status quo instead of growth and improvement. Stop people are followers not leaders. However, stop people are predictable and can be managed.”

Bittle’s eyes then focus on me while he slams his hand on the yellow circle. The answer has been repeatedly imprinted in my mind from previous lectures and I have no doubt how to answer the question…

Caution People

Bittle : “Vince, what kind of people are the most dangerous for an organization and the employees we want to avoid becoming at all costs?”

Me : “Caution People”

Bittle : “…and why should we be wary of these “Caution Employees”?”

Me : “Caution is needed as these workers are unpredictable. They are focussed on their own goals rather than the team’s goals. They take credit for other people’s ideas or work and may even try to sabotage the system or processes if it serves their purpose. Caution people will sometimes try to come across as Go People but will always be exposed for who they are in the end. Caution people are posers.”

We’re Go People

Sometimes I wonder why Bittle would continually repeat the Go People exercise over and over again, but years later I understood. Bittle’s Industrial Engineering class wasn’t only about how to improve the efficiency of a machine or process, it was about improving ourselves, teams and organizations. It’s about the type of workers, managers or leaders we need to become.